Maha Sarakham Police Using Sasumata

This is an interesting video I found on FB, purportedly from this article in the Nation, although I can’t find it there. It’s interesting mainly because the nonlethal weapon sasumata (known as a “man-catcher” in English) was adapted from an an ancient and very deadly samurai weapon of the same name (in Japanese, the English translation of which is “spear-fork”).

Ancient Sasumata (spear-fork)
Modern Sasumata (man-catcher)

 

Text from the Nation article:

Muang Maha Sarakham police demonstrate how to use sticks to subdue a suspect on Tuesday.

A video of Maha Sarakham police using Y-shaped and hooked sticks to subdue a frantic drunken man, which went viral on Monday, was part of a wider strategy, it was revealed.

It is part of Provincial Police Region 4 training to reduce injuries to suspects and arresting police when attempting to subdue knife-wielding or agitated people, said Muang Maha Sarakham precinct superintendent Colonel Chairoj Nakharaj. He said that once a week since last year, each precinct under Provincial Police Region 4 has had a team of four officers trained in how to use three Y-shaped and one hook-shaped stick to subdue suspects. The hook stick is used to pull a suspect off their feet and the Y-shaped sticks are used to hold them down.
Chairoj said the method is used only when deemed appropriate. The incident in the video, which went viral after its was posted on the precinct’s Facebook page, took place on Saturday after police were alerted to a drunken man wielding an object that looked like a long knife wrapped in a cloth at the Maha Sarakham Bus Station.
He was arrested for creating a public disturbance.

Related links:
Sasumata demonstration video at Japanese school (YouTube)
Teachers pin down knife-wielding man with two-pronged ‘man catcher’ (JapanToday article)

 

Misushit?

This is probably the best Matsushita knockoff name, ever (combined with a retailer’s misspelling) – and that’s saying a lot since Matsushita and National brands were folded into Panasonic¬†years ago. These trusted brand names live on in developing countries, even if new product lines do not.

I’ve seen¬†quite a few Matsushita, National, and Panasonic knockoff names (and that’s just a few from this electronics group), but the most often honored here and elsewhere is probably Mitsubishi, including the following permutations:

Mitsuboshi:”Three hats”

Mitsubashi: “Three bridges”

Mizubashi: “Water bridge”

Matsuboshi: “Pine hat”

etc.

“Mitsubishi” literally means “three water chestnuts,” but “-hishi” is what we call a diamond mark so it’s just descriptive of the logo.

Finding where Bill’s Bar was located.

Note to self: Look for the yellow building with slit windows. Surugamachi 2? Goddamn Japanese street numbers.

Bill's Bar Sound, Nara ( ????)

https://www.google.co.th/maps/place/Japan,+%E3%80%92630-8357+Nara-ken,+Nara-shi,+Surugamachi,+35%E2%88%922+%E4%B8%AD%E7%94%B0%E3%83%93%E3%83%AB/@34.6784822,135.8207621,3a,60y,328.03h,89.04t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sE_QVszFnHQ3pRUsmsXCwlA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!4m13!1m7!3m6!1s0x60013a2581e65349:0x5daa2b94dd96e74c!2zSmFwYW4sIOOAkjYzMC04MzU3IE5hcmEta2VuLCBOYXJhLXNoaSwgU3VydWdhbWFjaGksIDM14oiSMiDkuK3nlLDjg5Pjg6s!3b1!8m2!3d34.6786425!4d135.8208921!3m4!1s0x60013a2581e65349:0x5daa2b94dd96e74c!8m2!3d34.6786425!4d135.8208921?hl=en