Culinary subversion (Pancake Puff vs. Moffle)

A while back, G-man tipped me off in the comments that he’d found something pretty funny: Pancake Puffs, which seem an awful like something we’re used to seeing in Japan all the time (incidentally, I love how Google asks if you meant “teriyaki” when you search for “takoyaki”). Check it out:
pancake-puffs.jpg
I guess this can only be described as the result of a firesale at a takoyaki pan factory.
///////////////////////// – – THA FLIP SIDE – – /////////////////////////
Word of the day: Moffle

What is a moffle
?
Waffle is Mochi + Waffle, much in the way that “lion” + “tiger” = “liger” (or “tigon”)
I don’t have a problem with the moffle in theory, however, there are certain aspects of its execution that lack a certain, erm, appetizability. Case in point:
shiokaramoffle.jpg
Front and center is a shiokara moffle… Um.
Shiokara + mochi + waffle = interesting projectile vomit
Let me explain. From the wikipedia entry on shiokara:

Shiokara (??) is a food in Japanese cuisine made from various marine animals that consists of small pieces of the animal’s meat in a brown viscous paste of the animal’s heavily salted, fermented viscera. The raw viscera are mixed with about 10% salt, 30% malted rice, packed in a closed container, and fermented for up to a month.

Bon appetit! One of the worst kitchen chores I can possibly think of is having to clean burnt shiokara off of a waffle iron, but to each his own I guess.

1 thought on “Culinary subversion (Pancake Puff vs. Moffle)”

  1. Lol.
    $20, what a rip. I bought that pan at a local Asian merchant for like $4:
    http://sandmich.blogspot.com/2007/01/pots-and-pans.html
    It was sold for use in making a Vietnamese dish whose name I cannot recall because I threw away the sticker that was on the pan when I bought it (whoops).
    I tried making something similar to the pancake idea in it, but you know what’s even better? Regular pancakes. They’re bigger, cook faster and are easier to clean up after.

    Reply

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