We are Cosmic Buddha

Aadab arz hai.

They are not us, yo :

Cosmic Buddha has never charged for music, mostly because we know we suck (although that obviously does not stop others). We have not released music for many years, but we have the Real Media files, several mixtapes, and Y2K coding errors to prove we were first. Our band predates our blog on this domain by 10 years or so, and it’s been going since 2003.

Also, here’s some album art and gig posters from back in the day:

The DRAGON year.
Funk you, dude!
Apologies to Rollins Band…
Third mixtape/ First live gig art
Second mixtape art
First mixtape art
First unregistered music company

Seongbulhaseyo.

UPDATE: Really?

Marchall Amps AKA Weiduka

I was online looking for a cheap amp to replace my current cheap one (which has bust a capacitor or something and picked up an oscillating ground loop type hum) when I stumbled onto this beauty of a knockoff:

“AC8.8 power filter 3,000 Watt high-end “

At first glance, I thought it was a legit Marshall product made for millennials, because with the similar font, my brain just skipped over the odd letter.

But this is only part of the reason this is one of my favorite knockoffs this year. The other lies in the specs:

Wongchongkrong noise is the sound of the People’s high-end AC power filter…

Wongchongkrong for the people!

WONGCHONGKRONG FOREVER !!

Buy your own Wongchongkrong generator here.

CREAM Piano

Wow, this title just gave me flashbacks of my Thai nicknames research… Anyway, this piano is firmly stuck in my head now. I can leave the player on loop, go teach a class, and come back to hear the piano still haunting my living room. Awesome.

But hey, you know, if you’re going to go Wu-tang you have to remember where it came from as well:

We should also remember some of the places it ended up going as well:

Here’s more info on how these are related: ‘C.R.E.A.M.’: The Story Of A Sample

The Amerigo Gazaway track at top just dropped today. You can see his work here: Wu​-​Tang Clan – C​.​R​.​E​.​A​.​M. (Amerigo Gazaway Rework)

Delfonific!

I’m on a kick looking for BGM tonight, because I need to start writing chapters 4 & 5 of my master’s dissertation tomorrow. I will be aided by my trusty steed, Dragon Naturally Speaking and all of these badass beats. Sometimes Lofi radio on YouTube gets old…

And speaking of steeds, I’m planning selling my trusty CRF250M to help pay off Max’s upcoming trip to the states… Which looks likes it’s really gonna happen.

Where art thou, Casiotone?

All throughout university, I lusted after a Groovebox… the object of my affections has changed several times since then. Not that I have the skills or anything, I just want to watch the cow:

These used to retail for $1,000 when they were available.

Here’s another great video, with even more cow:

I actually don’t want the OP-1, I want a dedicated cow display with maybe one button to make it chew and kick start digestion.

Buddy Rich, John Bonham, Yoyoka Soma


The world needs hungry and talented drummers, even if most current music doesn’t employ real drums. There’s a story of past giants, as well as promise for the future laid out in these vids:

There is a self-intro from the girl on the Vimeo page where it was uploaded that wasn’t carried over to the YouTube version embedded above (and it’s a shame that Vimeo has never gotten to the level of reliability of YouTube, since it kicks ass in so many other areas):

My name is Yoyoka Soma. I am 8 year old Japanese drummer.

youtube.com/user/kaneaikaneai

When I was a just small baby, my parents had a home studio and there were various kinds of instruments. My parents were performing music activities as amateur singer-songwriters and they cradled me with their music. When I listened to their songs and guitar performances, I was eager to join them and couldn’t stop beating out a rhythm. That was why I started playing the drums. The drum was the first instrument in which I felt an interest in my life. My parents’ music peers often visited us to play together. I was glued to the powerful and dynamic performances by the drummers. At age 2, I was playing the drums as if I were playing with toys. At age 4, I started performing at concerts. At age 5, my family band “Kaneaiyoyoka” was formed by my parents. We have released 2 self-produced CD albums so far. Not only the drums, I also play the keyboard and perform as a vocalist. I compose lyrics and music as well.

My favorite drummers are John Bonham, Chris Coleman and Benny Greb.

As a drummer, I enjoy being groove, tones and try to support vocalists carefully. My dream is to be the best drummer in the world. In addition, I want to be an artist who can do anything: playing all instruments, recording music, mixing the sound and designing the CD album jackets. As I am aiming at overseas activities, I am studying English conversation. I want to become friends with people all over the world through my musical activities!

As HLAG is a contest only for women, I definitely can’t lose it. I want to be the best female drummer. Thanks to the great support by my family and fans, I can continue the practice and other musical activities. I want to show the best result of my daily practice and come out on top of this contest!

Social Network:
facebook: facebook.com/kaneaiyoyoka/
Twitter: twitter.com/yoyokadrums
web: kaneai.jimdo.com/

The Defiant Ones

Took me a while to get around to it, but this is the best documentary, ever. So, so many memories that basically defined my entire youth. In the whole series, there is exactly one album I don’t own, and I’ve used every hip hop album and artist mentioned in a mixtape or live set at some point (oh the time I had before we had kids lol).

I kept buying CDs long after Napster and Audiogalaxy, mostly because of the huge difference in sound quality those days, but I’ve only averaged about one or two per year in the past 10 years.

And I still load the Chronic in between Kendrick and Gucci every once in a while, because it will always be the king of car beats.

Finnish Polka Idoru – A Video Chronology of Loituma (from 17th Century Scandinavia to Modern Day Japan)

Disclaimer: The following is an approximate timeline; mistakes are inevitable. This is more of a way for me to record a collection of nodal points in case I want to revisit them in the future.

Methodology: YouTube embeds with sparse linkage to other sites. Why YouTube only? I’m inclined to track views on the embedded videos as well, because I have a hunch that they tie into something larger than Japanese Anime-Finnish Polka synergy.

1. In the Beginning, there was Stiff Bread
Finnish quartet Loituma releases “Ievan Polkka” (Eva’s Polka) in 1996. They seem to be as popular and relevant as you would expect a Finnish quartet to be at any time in human history. This sure is a catchy rendition of the song, though, which has murky (perhaps 17th century) but certainly ancient folk music roots, got very popular after WWII for a while, was forgotten for a couple decades, then became the most famous Finnish song in the world, in some form or another. This version is what started the whole resurgence:

Loituma members compose or arrange the tunes themselves, but often use improvisation. Lyrics come from many sources, including two main traditional sources: the Kalevala, the national epic of Finland; and the Kanteletar (source).

Many people refer to the lyrics of this song and the subsequent ones listed below as “scat,” which is an instantly understandable term even though the common definition is “improvised jazz singing in which the voice is used in imitation of an instrument.” From the song’s Wikipedia entry:

The song is sung in very heavy Eastern Savonian dialects spoken in North Karelia. It is fully understandable to speakers of standard Finnish.

2. The Orihime Catalyst
Orihime Inoue is a female character from the famous manga/anime series, Bleach. That’s as deep as I want to go into that, partially because even saying that word makes me wonder if I’ll ever hear an album as good as Nirvana Unplugged in New York again in my life.

In the spring of 2006, a Flash animation consisting of a few Orihime anime frames (with her holding a leek/spring onion) combined with audio from the scat section of Ievan Polkka was uploaded to Russian LiveJournal and went viral:

Leekspin AKA Loituma Girl was born. A tidal wave of covers, remixes, outright thievery, commercial usage, European ringtones, and sometimes imaginative derivatives would follow. A pretty good listing of these is here.

3. Loituma Sells Out
In 2007, Loituma capitalized on their winnings from the intarwebs polka scat lottery. Like, big time. In Europe, their song was used as a ringtone by major telecoms (remember paid ringtones?) and called Holly Dolly:

They also sold out to a Dutch Energy Company and let the corporate monkeys beatbox all over the track:

But the most heinous crime against their own song was undoubtedly this, from 2007:

This seems as good a place as any to mention the existence of a Hitler-parody version of this song on YouTube which is slightly amusing (because Hitler was a whiny bitch, haha) and has been ganked many, many times by different uploaders there over the years (I counted at least 10 instances of the same jacked-with-Chinese-subs vid), but that I won’t post here because, well, fuck him.

From this point on, we never really see the band Loituma again except in historical accounts because:

  • Finnish
  • Polka
  • Quartet

4. Enter the Nippon
In this section, I will attempt to briefly explain how Ievan Polkka became an icon of Japanese culture (at first, online only) and how it remains relevant in modern day Japan. The key word in the previous sentence is “briefly,” because we are in otaku territory here, and just want to see the scenery whizzing by as we pass through.

As Loituma was selling out in Europe, shit was getting real for their song in Japan. As predicted by the great visionary William Gibson, the way was being paved for virtual idoru (idol) / human interaction. Ievan Polka parodies, reworks, and derivative media was being shared on Japanese boards like 2chan and video sharing sites like NicoNico Douga in huge numbers.

Enter Vocaloid. Vocaloid was a voice synthesis technology and software partially backed by Yamaha. In August of 2007, they released “Hatsune Miku CV01 Vocaloid2.” Miku was advertised as a “Virtual Pop Star” instead of just a vocal synthesizer, using the sweet voice and cute character as major hooks. The software was tuned to create J-pop songs, but creating songs from other genres was possible (source).

This was created with Hatsune Miku and uploaded to Niconico Douga:

This single creation spawned thousands of derivative or related works on Niconico Douga alone, and from 2008, crossed over to YouTube and other western video sharing sites.

An interesting thing to note is that the character in the video above is actually fan art based on the official character, Hatsune Miku. The fan art character was named “Hachune Miku” and became the first fan art officially recognized by her corporate overlords, Crypton Future Media (seriously!). If you’re interested in reading about Miku’s more recent accomplishments (working with Pharrell and Lady Gaga!), check out this article from 2016: Meet Hatsune Miku, the Japanese Pop Star Hologram

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/raptor_czn/4327683361

You should scan through one of her concerts in HD, just to see how many people will go see a hologram that isn’t Tupac. The technology gets better every year, but here’s a good one from last year: Magical Mirai 2016

So what’s been happening lately with the song?

Well, the corporate Vevo overlords released (re-released?) an official video for it in 2015.

And the possibly most annoying version ever was released the same year, a nightstep (dubstep + nightcore) version (seriously, don’t click this unless you like 120bpm Minecraft video music):

In March of this year (2017), a young member from a Japanese idol girl group, Erika Ikuta, took the song back to its roots.

Oh, the irony… An actual idoru in TV reality following the work of a virtual idoru in the real world by restoring the human touches the song lost while in the ether!

And finally, do these jingles for a Japanese real estate company sound familiar?

Research Note: Sans Serif lower case L vs Capital i (l vs. I)
“Ievan Polkka” is often misspelled with an “L” in place of the leading “I” presumably because of the similarity between these two letters in an (often displayed by default) sans serif font. Therefore, Googling for “Levan Polkka” returns completely different results, some of which are real gems:

Other popular misspellings/variations include “Ievas Polkka,” “Leekgirl Song,” and “Leekspin Song.”

As an added bonus, I think this Finnish folk metal band really took the song back home in style:

Or maybe this song now belongs to the whole world:

NO MIKUS WERE HARMED IN THE WRITING OF THIS BLOGPOST.