A shift away from stocking trout

It seems that the DFG is going to continue to cut back on stocking trout in the Sierras (here’s the link). On top of this, trout are actually being removed from lakes to protect the threatened populations of yellow legged frogs.
I have fond memories of going fishing with our family, and coming home with a stringer full of trout. We caught so many rainbow trout that we frequently tossed them back. I remember being amazed that a farmed rainbow trout could be caught by using bubble gum as bait.
The new approach to balancing a healthy eco-system vs. the interests of anglers is a good change of policy, but I am glad that I was able to catch as many fish as I was able to (made up mostly of stocked trout). I look back at old pictures and just stare sometimes. How many jars of Potski’s, garlic marshmallows, chartreuse Powerbait and containers of earthworms and nightcrawlers did we go through?
As I am writing this, I remember that I don’t like the taste of trout and how laborious it is to pick out all of the bones, and the other issues that the catching of fish entails. For one, fishing was a good way of exploring the ethical implications and responsibilities inherent in taking an animal’s life for sport. What ever we caught, we had to clean and eat- that was the rule.
Cleaning a still gasping trout was traumatic the first couple of times I did it. I learned to respect the fish that I caught, and only keep what I intended to eat from that point on. On that note, I think the last time that I ate a rainbow trout that I caught was when I was over 10 years ago. Like I said, it doesn’t taste very good (unless it comes from cold water, or if it is coated in bread crumbs and fried in lemon butter if I remember correctly).

Ragondan Recipes

Just in case you happen to have a chunk of Nutria meat in the fridge and don’t know what to do with it, here are some recipes from The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. I wonder if capybaras are good eating too…

Good Luckistan

pic_0184[1].jpg
Taro is headed to Uzbekistan tomorrow for two months. The CIA World Factbook states that “Current concerns include terrorism by Islamic militants, economic stagnation, and the curtailment of human rights and democratization.”. Hmmm. Sounds kind of unpleasant and dangerous, but I hope he has a good time.
His mission amid the turmoil: to start up a tile exporting operation. Check out his blog to hear all about his experiences in this distant country. Stay safe, and see you in the Fall…

Mutant spork

spatula_spork.jpg
This hybridized spatula/fork (I guess it would still be a spork) was used to dispatch some okonomiyaki at a restaraunt in Umeda. The rounded tines proved utterly useless. This is a design that is unfit among sporks and spatulas, thus is destined be selected out of the gene pool. However, the existance of this freak utensil will be preserved here, as a random image in the footnotes of obscure culinary history.

Japanese WWII Propaganda

The color schemes used in Japanese propaganda work really well to romanticise the image of war, in all venues. The men pushing artillery through the jungle (not pictured), the arctic soldier, and the pilot all look so cool depicted as monochrome prints with the color imposed like a wood block print.
WWII_propaganda1.jpg
In winter fatigues.
WWII_propaganda2.jpg
An aviator.